Seminar Schedule

Date/Time Speaker Title
Upcoming Talks
Wed, Oct 19, 2016 @ 04:00 PM - 05:00 PM Stefano Ermon (Stanford) Measuring Progress towards Sustainable Development Goals with Machine Learning
Wed, Nov 9, 2016 @ 11:30 - 12:30 Dr. Paula Nurius (University of Washington ) Transdisciplinarity and Translation: Where Science is Going (and implications for your training)
Fri, Nov 18, 2016 @ 02:00 PM Nicole Immorlica (Microsoft Research) Maximizing the Social Good: Markets without Money
Thr, Dec 01, 2016 @ 02:00 PM Dr. Andy Plumptre (Wildlife Conservation Society) Improving the effectiveness of law enforcement in African Parks
Fri, Dec 02, 2016 @ 11:00 AM Dr. Andy Plumptre (Wildlife Conservation Society) How much to protect and where? Conservation planning in Africa’s biodiversity hotspot.
Fri, Jan 20, 2017 @ 11:00 AM Eva K Lee (H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology) System interoperability & Machine Learning: Multi-site Evidence-based Best Practice Discovery.
Mon, Feb 27, 2017 Pascal Van Hentenryck (Industrial and Operations Engineering, University of Michigan) The case of Infrastructure Optimization
TBD Desmond Patton (School of Social Work, Columbia University) TBD
Wed, Apr 26, 2017 Jay Sethuraman (Department of Industrial Engineering and Operations Research, Columbia University) TBD
Tue, May 02, 2017 Lucas Joppa (Microsoft Research) TBD

Seminar Details

Stefano Ermon (Stanford)
Wed, Oct 19, 2016 @ 04:00 PM - 05:00 PM
Location: Mark Taper Hall Of Humanities (THH) - 101
Audiences: Everyone Is Invited
Title: Measuring Progress towards Sustainable Development Goals with Machine Learning
Abstract: Recent technological developments are creating new spatio-temporal data streams that contain a wealth of information relevant to sustainable development goals. Modern AI techniques have the potential to yield accurate, inexpensive, and highly scalable models to inform research and policy. As a first example, I will present a machine learning method we developed to predict and map poverty in developing countries. Our method can reliably predict economic well-being using only high-resolution satellite imagery. Because images are passively collected in every corner of the world, our method can provide timely and accurate measurements in a very scalable end economic way, and could revolutionize efforts towards global poverty eradication. As a second example, I will present some ongoing work on monitoring agricultural and food security outcomes from space.
Bio: Stefano Ermon is currently an Assistant Professor in the Department of Computer Science at Stanford University, where he is affiliated with the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory and the Woods Institute for the Environment. He completed his PhD in computer science at Cornell in 2015. His research interests include techniques for scalable and accurate inference in graphical models, statistical modeling of data, large-scale combinatorial optimization, and robust decision making under uncertainty, and is motivated by a range of applications, in particular ones in the emerging field of computational sustainability. Stefano has won several awards, including two Best Student Paper Awards, one Runner-Up Prize, and a McMullen Fellowship.
Dr. Paula Nurius (University of Washington )
Wed, Nov 9, 2016 @ 11:30 PM - 12:30 PM
Location: Social Work Center (SWC) - 106
Audiences: Everyone Is Invited
Title:Transdisciplinarity and Translation: Where Science is Going (and implications for your training!)
Abstract: The relationship of science to society and the scientific marketplace itself is rapidly evolving to accommodate shifting factors. Universities face challenges in keeping pace. What are some key drivers, concepts, and meta-competencies that will be helpful to you in navigating preparation for your research careers and collaboratively innovating with your academic settings? Bring your curiosity, perspective, and voice to this presentation and conversation.
Bio: Dr. Paula Nurius, Grace Beals-Ferguson Scholar, Professor, and Associate Dean at the University of Washington School of Social Work brings a history of leadership in doctoral training, program directorship, and mentoring for productivity and early career success. She is the inaugural recipient of the GADE Award for Educational Leadership in Doctoral Education and an elected fellow of the American Academy of Social Work and Social Welfare and the Society for Social Work and Research.
Nicole Immorlica (Microsoft Research)
Wed, Nov 18, 2016 @ 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
Location: Seeley G. Mudd Building (SGM) -123
Audiences: Everyone Is Invited
Title:Maximizing the Social Good: Markets without Money
Abstract: o create a truly sustainable world, we need to both generate ample amounts of resources and allocate them appropriately to those that value them highly. In traditional economics, these goals are achieved using money. People are paid to produce valuable resources. Resources are sold at an appropriately high price, guaranteeing that the buyers had high value for them. However, in many settings of particular social significance, monetary transactions are infeasible. Sometimes this is because society has deemed it immoral to sell certain things, like seats at public schools or organs for transplantation. Other times it is because of technological constraints, like when the environment is electronic and there are no banks linked to user accounts.
Bio: Nicole's research lies broadly within the field of algorithmic game theory. Using tools and modeling concepts from both theoretical computer science and economics, Nicole hopes to explain, predict, and shape behavioral patterns in various online and offline systems, markets, and games. Her areas of specialty include social networks and mechanism design. Nicole received her Ph.D. from MIT in Cambridge, MA in 2005 and then completed three years of postdocs at both Microsoft Research in Redmond, WA and CWI in Amsterdam, Netherlands before accepting a job as an assistant professor at Northwestern University in Chicago, IL in 2008. She joined the Microsoft Research New England Lab in 2012.
Dr. Andy Plumptre (Wildlife Conservation Society)
Thr, Dec 01, 2016 @ 02:00 PM - 02:50 PM
Location:(THH) -301
Audiences: Everyone Is Invited
Title:Improving the effectiveness of law enforcement in African Parks.
Abstract: Investment in law enforcement in protected areas in Africa typically form more than 50% of the budget and often nearer 85-90%. Yet there has been very little research looking at ways that ranger patrolling could be improved and made more efficient and effective. This presentation will present work that has been undertaken in Uganda to improve law enforcement and discuss areas of research that are still needed to better understand how to improve enforcement.
Bio: Andy Plumptre, PhD is a tropical conservation scientist who has been working for the past 25 years in the Albertine Rift Region of Africa, one of the most biodiverse parts of the continent. His work has focused on many different issues related to the conservation of this region including developing new methods for surveying primates in forests, improving ranger patrolling in protected areas, conservation planning for the Albertine Rift, building national capacity to undertake monitoring and research, supporting transboundary conservation, and establishing new protected areas.
Dr. Andy Plumptre (Wildlife Conservation Society)
Fri, Dec 02, 2016 @ 11:00 AM - 11:50 AM
Location: Seeley G. Mudd Building (SGM) -101
Audiences: Everyone Is Invited
Title:How much to protect and where? Conservation planning in Africa’s biodiversity hotspot.
Abstract: The Albertine Rift is the richest region for vertebrate conservation in Africa. Protected areas have been established here in the past but mainly for large mammal species. This presentation will look at where needs to be conserved in the region to maximise the conservation impacts in terms of species protected whilst at the same time avoiding future mining developments in the region and the impacts of future climate change. Using conservation planning science to demonstrate the uniqueness of sites then led to the creation of new protected areas.
Bio: Andy Plumptre, PhD is a tropical conservation scientist who has been working for the past 25 years in the Albertine Rift Region of Africa, one of the most biodiverse parts of the continent. His work has focused on many different issues related to the conservation of this region including developing new methods for surveying primates in forests, improving ranger patrolling in protected areas, conservation planning for the Albertine Rift, building national capacity to undertake monitoring and research, supporting transboundary conservation, and establishing new protected areas.
Eva K Lee
Fri, Jan 20, 2016
Location: TBD
Audiences: Everyone Is Invited
Title:System interoperability & Machine Learning: Multi-site Evidence-based Best Practice Discovery.
Abstract: This study establishes interoperability among electronic medical records from 737 healthcare sites and performs machine learning for best practice discovery. A mapping algorithm is designed to disambiguate free text entries and to provide a unique and unified way to link content to structured medical concepts despite the extreme variations that can occur during clinical diagnosis documentation. Redundancy is reduced through concept mapping. A SNOMED-CT graph database is created to allow for rapid data access and queries. These integrated data can be accessed through a secured web-based portal. A classification model ((DAMIP) is then designed to uncover discriminatory characteristics that can predict the quality of treatment outcome. We demonstrate system usability by analyzing Type II diabetic patients. DAMIP establishes a classification rule on a training set which results in greater than 80% blind predictive accuracy on an independent set of patients. By including features obtained from structured concept mapping, the predictive accuracy is improved to over 88%. The results facilitate evidence-based treatment and optimization of site performance through best practice dissemination and knowledge transfer. This project receives the 2016 NSF Health Organization Transformation award.
Bio: Dr. Lee is a Professor in the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering at Georgia Institute of Technology, and Director of the Center for Operations Research in Medicine and HealthCare, a center established through funds from the National Science Foundation and the Whitaker Foundation. The center focuses on biomedicine, public health, and defense, advancing domains from basic science to translational medical research; intelligent, quality, and cost-effective delivery; and medical preparedness and protection of critical infrastructures. She is a Distinguished Scholar in Health Systems, Health System Institute at Georgia Tech and Emory University. She is also the Co-Director of the Center for Health Organization Transformation, an NSF Industry/University Cooperative Research Center. Lee partners with hospital leaders to develop novel transformational strategies in delivery, quality, safety, operations efficiency, information management, change management and organizational learning. Lee's research focuses on mathematical programming, information technology, and computational algorithms for risk assessment, decision making, predictive analytics and knowledge discovery, and systems optimization. She has made major contributions in advances to medical care and procedures, emergency response and medical preparedness, healthcare operations, and business operations transformation. Dr. Lee serves on the National Preparedness and Response Science Board. She is the principle investigator of an online interoperable information exchange and decision support system for mass dispensing, emergency response, and casualty mitigation. The system integrates disease spread modeling with response processes and human behavior; and offers efficiency and quality assurance in operations and logistics performance. It currently has over 9500+ public health site users. Lee has also performed field work within the U.S. on mass dispensing design and evaluation, and has worked with local emergency responders and affected populations after Hurricane Katrina, the Haiti earthquake, the Fukushima Japan radiological disaster, and Hurricane Sandy. Lee has received multiple analytics and practice excellence awards including INFORMS Franz Edelman award, Daniel H Wagner prize for novel cancer therapeutics, bioterrorism emergency response dispensing for mass casualty mitigation, optimizing and transforming clinical workflow and patient care, vaccine immunity prediction, and reducing hospital acquired conditions. Dr. Lee is an INFORMS Fellow. She has received seven patents on innovative medical systems and devices.